Weekly Kyunghyang cover story asks, “Is it impossible to co-exist with street vendors?”

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A matter of law enforcement or livelihood struggles of the urban poor? Winter is high season for street vending and urban crackdown as can be seen in the recent violence against street vendors in Gangnam district of Seoul. With hundreds of city-hired security contractors (a.k.a. “thugs”) recorded on video overturning carts and destroying vendor property, it’s also high time to consider the urgent questions of informal economy, urban poverty, and state violence. Are legalization and taxation the obvious solution? It’s not such a simple matter, the article argues. For one, there is an enormous range among street vendors, from corporate to livelihood-based, income levels, and vending forms… Read more ›

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Application Summer Institute on military occupation, Cornell University

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Looks like an interesting & timely theme for sure. “Preoccupation with occupation in its multiple forms is spreading. The theme of the Third Annual Summer Institute at Cornell University is military occupation and its civilian society relatives. Military occupation refers to temporary control of territory by a conquering nation. Such occupation at times continues open-endedly as post-war governance: 11 of 42 military occupations since the end of World War II continue today.” Read more ›

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Open Letter from Rainbow Action in Seoul

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Apparently Mayor Park yielded under pressure of extreme rightists and conservative protestant groups of South Korea. These groups of bigots have persistently pathologized and stigmatized sexual minorities and gender nonconforming people. They have been virtually following every public event held by LGBTQ groups to violently disrupt those scenes and attack the participants for last few years. Read more ›

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Political and religious homophobia in Korea

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(Right-wing) “patriotic Christian political forces” is the cover story of Hankyoreh 21 magazine after their violent and hate-filled disruption of the human rights charter hearing in Seoul last week. In what was only the latest in insanely regressive political climate in Read more ›

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Korean Studies postdoc at USC

The USC Korean Studies Institute is accepting applications for its 2015-2016 postdoctoral fellows program, open to scholars from all fields whose research pertains to Korea or involves Korea as part of a larger comparative or interdisciplinary research. Particularly encouraged are proposals from the social sciences and non-traditional fields, such as Korean-American studies. Read more ›

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Job: Lecturer in Korean Studies at University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australia (UWA) is looking for applicants with a PhD in Korean Studies or in any Social Sciences or Humanities discipline related to the study of Korea. Candidates should have a dynamic research and teaching profile, a strong track record in Korean Studies and teaching experience at tertiary level. A native or near native fluency in Korean and competency in both spoken and written English is required and experience in teaching at university level is essential. Read more ›

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CFP: Transgender Studies Quarterly: The Translation Issue

Special Issue on Translating Transgender, due March 1, 2015 for publication in Spring 2016. Few primary and secondary texts about transgender lives and ideas have been translated from language to language in any formal way over the centuries. Meanwhile, transgender, gender variant, and gender non-confirming people have often been exiles, translators, language mediators, and multilinguals in greater numbers and intensities historically than their cisgender counterparts have. Read more ›

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The Persistence of Cold War Regime: The Discourse “Chongbuk Chwap’a” in South Korea

How might one explain the rise of the discourse of “chongbuk chwap’a” 종북좌파 (a term commonly translated as “pro-North leftists”) given South Korea’s recent history of the democratization movement and the transition from a series of authoritarian regimes to a parliamentary democracy? In what ways does this discourse differ from the anticommunism of the earlier period? What are some historical and political implications of the discourse in contemporary South Korea? Read more ›

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